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  1. Greenland Run-Off Election Invalid

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    December 10, 2010 by wcobserver

    By Susan McCarthy susan@wcobserver.com Greenland- Questions raised just one day after last week’s run-off election for Greenland’s last city council seat have resulted in the the election and its winner being deemed invalid after it was learned that the winner, Matt Partain, did not live in Greenland’s Ward 4. Ironically, doubt about whether Partain lived within Ward 4 was brought to light by Tom Hendricks who was appointed to the council seat Partain was vying for when Mark Myers resigned in August after he moved out of Ward 4. “He worked the election and raised the question last Wednesday,” said Danny Wright, who serves as the attorney for the City of Greenland. Wright said he met on Monday, immediately following Thanksgiving weekend, with Mayor John Gray, Mayor-Elect Bill Groom, and City Clerk Donna Cheevers. “The election is void.  He did not legally run. He cannot serve,” said Wright who indicated Partain lives in Ward 2. “The guy across the street lives in Ward 4.” “When you have oddly drawn districts, mistakes can happen,” said Gray.  “It’s odd it didn’t get caught before the election.” Wright said that technically it is the responsibility of the candidate running for office to know …

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  2. Winter Weather Prediction Revealed

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    December 10, 2010 by Joseph C. Neal

    By Susan McCarthy susan@wcobserver.com Predicting a week’s worth of weather is a tricky business, never mind an entire winter’s worth.  But experts as well as old weather lore that have been around for centuries will look to everything from water temperatures and jet streams to wooly worms and persimmon seeds to make a winter weather prediction.  The “Farmer’s Almanac”, which many look to as the standing expert on long-term weather predictions, started using a secret formula in 1792 to predict the weather, but have since added meteorology, climatology and solar science to their formula. What a difference a day can make.  We went from a Monday with temperatures in the 60’s to a Tuesday that didn’t’ climb out of the 30’s, which made us all start wondering…what kind of winter will we see? Well….here’s what the experts are saying. “The wooly worms are really fuzzy and they’re black this year,” says Doug Johnson, who serves as fire chief in Berryville, but also happens to deliver our paper from the printer every Wednesday. “When they’re all black, it looks like a hard winter all the way through.” Johnson says when the worm’s head is brown and the body is black, the …

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  3. Bakery Not So Pie In The Sky

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    December 9, 2010 by wcobserver

    Orders Flow in Tough Economy By Susan McCarthy This Thanksgiving, many of us will enjoy a slice of pie, but for Tim and Rhonda Glenn, pies are never far from their minds every day of the year as the owners of Letha’s Pies at 88 North Centennial Ave. in West Fork. A year ago Tim and Rhonda Glenn wondered whether their re-born bakery would be able to keep its doors open.  Yet a year later, the couple has been inundated with orders and while working full-time jobs by day they, spend nights and weekends with eight part-time employees making fried pies for restaurants and convenience stores in seven states. Last Saturday, the kitchen at Letha’s Pies was bustling.  Workers stirred enormous bowls of apple and chocolate pie filling while others scooped filling into rounds of pie crust, moistening the edges with water from a pastry brush and then hand-crimping individual-sized fried pies one after another. Next door, Tim was running a jigsaw, making way for new outlets that would power a 19’ x 29’ freezer that is part of an expansion that will double the bakery’s square footage. “It’s a fun environment to work in…it’s easy going,” said Amber Baxley, …

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  4. New Athletic Field House Gets Green Light

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    December 8, 2010 by wcobserver

    Fundraising and Donations to Fund Facility By Susan McCarthy Greenland- Fundraising will swing into high gear to build a new Athletic Field House after the Greenland School Board gave its approval Nov. 17 to move forward with the project.  The estimated $150,000 project will be fully funded through donations and a number of planned fundraisers and will not cost the school district any funds said Superintendent Dr. Charles Cudney. Cudney said that about $11,000 has already been raised for the new field house which will house a weight room, a locker room, concessions, a laundry room and restrooms.  Athletic Director Lee Larkan said the field house would be located where the existing concessions are now, at the east end of the football field.  The school board approved the hiring of Key Architecture, Inc. who has completed preliminary drawings of the 6000-square foot facility.  Larkan said the architect was engaged last fall when the school was still under state control, but under the agreement they would be paid only if the project was approved and funded. School Board Member Dan Marzoni expressed concern about paying for the field house’s upkeep, utilities and sewer, “I’m concerned about taking on another facility when …

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  5. Deck The Halls And Win

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    December 8, 2010 by wcobserver

    City Hosts Second Lighting Competition By Susan McCarthy West Fork- City workers began hanging holiday decorations in the city of West Fork Monday, but city officials hope those are pale in comparison to the entrants they expect to see in the second annual “Small Town, Big Lights” competition. Last year, the city’s lighting competition had 25 entrants and this year Parks Director David Roebke is hoping to double that number.  Roebke says there is no charge to enter, but the competition is limited to homes within West Fork City Limits. “They can have lights with music, yard ornaments, all lights, trees, anything in their front yard,” said Roebke. To enter the Small Town, Big Lights competition, visit West Fork City Hall to complete an entry application.  Roebke said judging will begin at 6:30 p.m. on Dec. 17 and that the top three houses will be given cash prizes. “We’ll just judge it on the wow effect,” said Roebke who expects to have at least two out of town judges help him select the winners this year. The top three winners will receive a 50/30/20 split of sponsorship donations made by local businesses.  Roebke said the top prize winner last year …

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  6. Johnson Inks To Play For John Brown

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    December 2, 2010 by wcobserver

    By Brent Harrison WEST FORK – Last week West Fork forward/center Jared Johnson (6-foot-6) gave his signature to play basketball next year for Coach Clark Sheehy and the John Brown Eagles. Johnson, a two-time All-State and All-District selection averaged 14 points and 10 rebounds a game for David Ferrell’s Tigers as a junior. “JBU is a perfect fit for Jared,” Ferrell said. “It’s a great school and a great coach,  I think he made a real wise choice. He can help them, and it’s a great environment. It comes at a good time because they lose one of their two post players.” “He’s really agile and he shoots well for a big guy,” Ferrell said. “He worked hard over the summer.  He expanded his game and now he’s much better from 6-8 feet.” Jared is the son John and Rose Mary Johnson and plans to major in education.

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  7. Joe Remembers When, Part III

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    December 1, 2010 by wcobserver

    This week we continue with part three of a six part series about Joe Copeland.  I first met Joe Copeland this summer at the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Reunion at Devil’s Den State Park and soon learned he’d written a small booklet about his 90 years of life and offered to let us publish excerpts in the Washington County Observer . We hope you’ll enjoy a glimpse into his life in the Zinnamon area of West Fork and beyond. Dad taught at various places in Washington County for several years; it seemed to me that most of the time he got $30 per month.  He would spend a while at the University each summer in order to keep his teacher’s certificate current.  We lived at Zinnamon all this time where all the other seven living children were born.  Some of the time during this period, I can remember that we could earn money to buy groceries by making railroad ties.  There were three grades of them and the best grade sold for 35 cents.  Of course, we always wanted to have all top-grade ties, and I would load 12 of them on the wagon and drive them ten miles to …

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