RSS Feed

  1. February is Dental Month

    0

    February 8, 2012 by Linda Ford

    pet_vet_digest_logo-150x150

    The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) has designated February as Pet Dentistry Month. You may see promotions on TV and printed media. This is designed to help people become more aware of their pets’ oral health. Hardly anyone brushes the teeth of their pets on a regular basis. Back when dogs and cats ate real food (birds, rats, deer bone, etc), you hardly saw much dental disease. I can tell an outside, free roaming dog by his beautiful teeth. They may be worn down a bit from chewing on bones and hides but there’s absolutely no tartar or gingivitis. Now days, pets mostly eat pet food and table food. I am highly critical of pet food manufacturers not only for the oral disease these products create but all the other problems they cause as well. I believe commercial pet foods are also responsible for creating obesity, diabetes and on and on. Corn cannot be digested by dogs and cats and sets them up for a variety of ailments including dental disease. See how many pet foods you can find that don’t contain corn or wheat gluten from China. Since you can’t rely on Purina and Hill’s Science Diet to create …

    Read More...

  2. Animals That Hibernate

    0

    February 8, 2012 by Devils Den

    DevilsDenDiary-300x300

    Many of us are familiar with animals that hibernate. Squirrels, opossums, chipmunks, skunks and bats are among some of the mammals that hibernate. These animals enter hibernation in the winter to conserve energy by going into a deep sleep-like state. Hibernation can vary widely lasting several weeks or several hours a day. This is called a torpor or temporary hibernation. With a slowed heart rate and lowered body temperature, these animals have adapted to survive cold winters with little or no sustenance. The dormant state means that the animals function minimally to conserve energy. Many times these animals come out of hibernation to snack on harvested food. In the months leading up to hibernation, the animal has stored fat by eating more than usual. No one knows exactly what triggers hibernation in various animals. It might be the cooler temperatures, a change in light exposure, or the lessening of the food sup- ply. As the days begin to grow shorter and the trees are dropping their nuts and leaves, the animals at Devil’s Den State Park scurry around getting the last of their food sup- ply stored away for the winter. So before our furry friends disappear into their holes, …

    Read More...

  3. Wilderness First Responder Course Offered

    0

    February 8, 2012 by wcobserver

    Wilderness-First-Responder

    The need for remote medical first responders is being addressed when, for its second year, the Ozarks Outdoors program at University of the Ozarks hosts a nationally recognized Wilderness First Responder course presented by the Wilderness Medicine Institute (WMI) of the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) from March 17-25 on the Clarksville campus. The certification course is designed to provide people with the tools to make critical medical and evacuation decisions in remote locations. ​Special topics include: wound management and infection, realigning fractures and dislocations, improvised splinting techniques, patient monitoring and long term management problems, up-to-date information on all environmental emergencies, plus advice on drug therapies. ​The nine-day, 80-hour Wilderness First Responder curriculum also includes standards for urban and extended care situations. The WMI Adult and Child CPR are included and the course is pre-approved for 70 hours of EMT Continuing Education Hours. Participants must be at least 16 years old. The cost to register is $595 which does not cover lodging or food. A limited number of hostel bunks are available at the Ozarks Outdoors BaseCamp, along with a limited number of primitive campsites at the Ozarks Outdoors DemoCamps on campus. Registration by March 1 is recommended. For more …

    Read More...

  4. GUEST COMMENTARY: Rule of Law Fosters Freedom

    0

    February 8, 2012 by wcobserver

    Fitzpatrick

    The 21st century, like the 18th century, is a time to try America’s soul. Blatantly unconstitutional “security” laws have been passed, giving the Executive Office power to arrest on a whim; detain indefinitely on a whim; deny trials on a whim. America has been here before. The 1770s were times that tried America’s soul. American “insurgents” held out against the British Army and Navy until Ben Franklin convinced the French (the enemy of my enemy is my friend) to aid us with their professional army and navy. Together, we defeated British tyranny. Our founders so hated executives that from 1776 until 1787, we did without one. That didn’t work, so they wrote “Rule of Law” into a Constitution. America was a “Rule of Law” nation, firmly rejecting “Rule of Man.” We again, 225 years after our Constitution was written, live in Rule of Man — times that try our American soul. Our previous executive took a police issue (mass murder by a small group of religious wackos) and started a war, claimed powers supposedly granted by his war to extort legislation granting him more powers and used unconstitutional “signing statements” to disobey any law he didn’t like. The current executive …

    Read More...

  5. We’ve Always Done It That Way (Part 10)

    0

    February 8, 2012 by wcobserver

    editorial-300x300

    West Fork news item: Mayor Hime informed the Council that by moving a full- time employee from the Water Department the Street Department without prior approval of the Water Commission or City Council, Michael “Butch” Bartholomew has broken the law and the budgets will need to be corrected. Wearing a lot of hats may draw praise from some people, it but can sometimes lead to what social psychologists call “role conflict.” We’ve all experienced it to some ex- tent when we find ourselves trying to occupy two incompatible roles at the same time. It often takes the form of a conflict between the expectations of performing one’s family role and the expectations of a career role; demands of work vs. demands of the job, for example. Role conflict may lead to situations of social awkwardness and frustration causing heightened anxiety. Or it can take on a more ominous character and drift into situations that can lead to ethical and even legal problems. Job-related role conflict is not uncommon. Many people have experienced conflicting demands of their job resulting from hazy job descriptions, blurred lines of authority or “too many bosses.” Welcome to West Fork. The city’s organizational structure resembles a …

    Read More...

  6. Swingin’ and Swayin’ in Elkins

    0

    February 8, 2012 by wcobserver

    DSC_8915

    ELKINS – If you are anywhere between the ages of nine and 90 and like to dance, the Community Center in Elkins is the place to be on Friday nights. On any Friday night, you can find 120 to 150 friendly people dancing, enjoying snacks from the concession booth and just generally having a good time. Among them will probably be Whitley Anschutz, who has been volunteering there since she was five years old while her father, Ray Anschutz, patrolled the area as a deputy sheriff. Whitley is part of the band Shadow Creek, which plays there three nights a month. Other members of the band include Lisa Turner on the drums, Rick Jones on the keyboard, Jackie Baker on bass and Billy Mounce on guitar. “A few years ago, the disco ball had to be retired,” said Whitely. “But the floor is nicely lighted by multiple strings of tiny white lights while dancers scoot their boots to country tunes and swing their partners to square dancing numbers.” And boy, do they swing! In the soft light of the overhanging bulbs, folks like Wiley Hobbs and his sister Evelyn Hayes twirled around the Community Center’s dance floor with aplomb. After …

    Read More...

  7. THE ALL VOLUNTEER ARMY: WashCo’s Search & Rescue Team

    0

    February 8, 2012 by wcobserver

    searchandrescue

    FARMINGTON – Every so often, John Luther will stop talking. He and Willie Watts, who’s sitting right beside him, will stare somewhere into the distance, their ears resting on every sound crackling from the radio. They’re listening to a call coming through — it could be an emergency — at the Farmington Fire Station. “I like to listen to every call [coming in],” says Luther, the Search & Rescue Coordinator for Washington County. “When I hear a call coming into the county, I know some- body is running.” That running somebody is likely to be on Luther’s team. With an operation of about 100 volunteers — many of whom are full- time firefighters, too — the Urban Search and Rescue (S&R) is an essential component of the Washington County’s emergency response team, one that has grown impressively over the past several decades. While search and rescue operations have been ongoing since the 1970s. The pioneers of the Washington County S&R, like David Scott, Joel Sacassberry and Mitch McCorkle not only operated the local fire department but built their own rescue rigs and coordinated searches. The operation really picked up in about 2004, though, with federal funds from Homeland Security helping …

    Read More...