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Posts Tagged ‘Linda Ford’

  1. Pet food recalls

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    May 27, 2012 by Linda Ford

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    There have been a number of new pet food recalls in the last couple of months. The newest being that of the Diamond pet food company. The recalls so far are from their plant in South Carolina. The offending ingredient this time is the GI pathogen known as Salmonella. This bacteria is one that can be transmitted from pets to people. It causes vomiting and diarrhea. Some cases are severe enough to cause dehydration which can lead to kidney failure. The liver can also be affected. It can be deadly to the very young and the very old or debilitated. If a person comes in contact with the vomitus or fecal matter or even handles the pet food, he can become infected. Diamond makes puppy and dog food. They also make Taste of the Wild but I have been assured that the food carried at Halbert’s and here at our clinic are not on the recall list and were made at another plant.

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  2. The flea life cycle, lets review this again…

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    May 9, 2012 by Linda Ford

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    “That frontline stuff doesn’t work anymore.” You don’t know how many times I’ve heard that statement. But, after extensive interrogation of the person telling me this, light is shed and we proceed to have the whole flea life cycle discussion.

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  3. Fatal Tick Diseases of Dogs and Cats in NW Arkansas

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    April 26, 2012 by Linda Ford

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    I’m sure it’s obvious by now to everyone who ventures outdoors that the ticks are already bad this year. And every year about this time I write about the fatal tick diseases we have to deal with in our neck of the woods-literally. People think the ticks are so bad because the winter was short. The real reason they seem to get worse every year is the fact that the practice of burning the under brush every spring has fallen by the wayside. Sure, they do a few controlled burns here and there every year but nothing like was done in the past-the way past. I’m afraid if we get into real drought conditions like hit Texas, this whole countyside is going to go up in flames. That might be good for lowering the tick populations but I doubt if losing houses to forest fire is worth the trade off. By far, the worst tick disease we have here is the cat one that has a parasitic relationship with bobcats but is fatal to domestic cats. It is caused by the protozoon called  Cytauxzoon felis. The organism is related to another Cytauxzoon organism found in ungulates in Africa. It was …

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  4. Cat “Psych” 101

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    April 5, 2012 by Linda Ford

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    Unless you were born and raised “reared” with cats around, you may be perplexed at times as to their behavior. Dogs are easy to figure out but cats are another story all together.

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  5. Tick Season

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    March 26, 2012 by Linda Ford

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    In case you haven’t noticed, the ticks are out again. I noticed the first wave about a month ago when my horses started swishing their tails. Sure enough, when I checked under the tails ticks were already attached and feeding. I got out my doggy Frontline and wiped a small amount on each horse. That took care of the first wave. Almost every dog we get in the clinic now, if it’s not on a preventive, is covered in small ticks. There are number of diseases that dogs, cats, horses, cows and people can get from tick bites. The worst one for dogs is Eh- rlichiosis. We just had a dog in the hospital that was drowning in his own blood that had leaked into his chest. We removed 1.5 liters of blood from his thoracic cavity and he was finally able to breathe again after many sleepless nights of sitting up—the owners, too. Ehrlichiosis destroys the plate- lets in the blood. Platelets cause the blood to clot to prevent bleeding out after a trauma or cut. I’ve seen many dogs die suddenly and blood come gushing from the nostrils. Young dogs aren’t nearly as susceptible to bleeding out as …

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  6. What They Ate in 2011

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    February 24, 2012 by Linda Ford

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    Last year about this time I wrote an article about all the non food type items found in dog and cat GI tracts. Every year Veterinary Practice News holds a contest called “ They Ate What?” In Vet Medicine we refer to it as dietary indiscretion. Here is a sampling of what they ate in 2011. A dog came in to a clinic with the signs of lameness. On radiographic image they found nine handballs in the dog’s stomach. Another dog’s radio-graphs showed a hodgepodge of stuff and the surgeon re- moved shoelaces, mulch, a knee high stocking, a plastic plant, plastic twist ties, and the bristles of a car snow cleaning brush. A six month old bulldog ate a metal slip collar and became ill and was taken to the vet. At surgery the doctor found 2 slip collars. Ten baby bottle nipples were found in the stomach of a four month old golden retriever puppy. One dog owner was feeding his dog pea- nut butter from a spoon and the dog grabbed spoon and all and swallowed it. Upon surgical removal they also discovered a piece of a collar and a toy. One dog was taken to the …

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  7. February is Dental Month

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    February 8, 2012 by Linda Ford

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    The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) has designated February as Pet Dentistry Month. You may see promotions on TV and printed media. This is designed to help people become more aware of their pets’ oral health. Hardly anyone brushes the teeth of their pets on a regular basis. Back when dogs and cats ate real food (birds, rats, deer bone, etc), you hardly saw much dental disease. I can tell an outside, free roaming dog by his beautiful teeth. They may be worn down a bit from chewing on bones and hides but there’s absolutely no tartar or gingivitis. Now days, pets mostly eat pet food and table food. I am highly critical of pet food manufacturers not only for the oral disease these products create but all the other problems they cause as well. I believe commercial pet foods are also responsible for creating obesity, diabetes and on and on. Corn cannot be digested by dogs and cats and sets them up for a variety of ailments including dental disease. See how many pet foods you can find that don’t contain corn or wheat gluten from China. Since you can’t rely on Purina and Hill’s Science Diet to create …

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