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Posts Tagged ‘Political Spectrum’

  1. Political Specturum: A View From the Left — Birth Control

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    March 15, 2012 by Richard Drake

    Question: Why is the national political debate so preoccupied with the topic of birth control? We’ve all been hearing a lot recently about religious liberty, freedom, the First Amendment and how lots and lots of men feel about the birth control debate that is sweeping this country. Well, one says “debate,” but in reality, the debate was settled long ago: most Americans are in favor not only of birth control, but also of having insurance companies pay for it. What began as a skirmish with the Roman Catholic Church has spread far and wide. Then again, not really. The national media, ever slow to pick up on a story, has failed to noticed that attacks on a woman’s right to choose birth control or have access to an abortion have been under assault for some years now. Literally millions of words have been written and spoken on the subject, but this is what it all boils down to: Women don’t have sense enough to come in out of the rain. I was going to go with the old cliche, “Women don’t know their place,” but we’ll come to that one soon enough. But really, when it it is all said …

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  2. A View From the Right: Who’s Winning the Republican Nomination Race?

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    February 24, 2012 by Mike Landry

    Candidates in the Republican Primary are described at various times with such terms as surging, withdrawing, forging ahead or making a comeback, in a chaotic race to the convention. What’s going on? Whose on first? Romney? Bachmann? Perry? Cain? Gingrich? Santorum? What’s been happening? Just a Republican primary doing what it’s supposed to do: vet the candidates and find the one most desired to go up against the incumbent President. True, it’s been a convoluted one. But that’s due to four forces using the Re- publican primary race to duke it out. The first major force is the GOP establishment. Romney’s their guy: a former governor, successful in business, good family, telegenic. Had “The West Wing” been a conservative show, Mitt Romney would have been cast as President Josiah Bartlet. And while Establishment Republicans like to throw out a lot of conservative language, on their laptops they spell the names of guys like Romney as m-o-d-e-r-a-t-e. Pleasant, respectable, unlikely to scare the horses. Sort of like Bob Dole with an MBA. Establishment Republicans tend to fear the second major force: the news media, also known as the Democratic Ministry of Propaganda (DEM-OP). DEM-OP’s role in this fight has been to …

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  3. A View from the Left: Who’s Winning the Republican Nomination Race?

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    February 24, 2012 by Richard Drake

    Candidates in the Republican Primary are described at various times with such terms as surging, withdrawing, forging ahead or making a comeback, in a chaotic race to the convention. What’s going on? I used to joke that politics should be covered by sports writers, as that might bring some excitement to the manner of storytelling. But honestly? Many sports writers are as prone to use cliches — and drive them into the ground — as other journalists. Over the past few years, we have seen the gradual militarization of the English language, especially where it pertains to political reporting. There is a small part of me, the man who is nourished on clichés and rarely comes out to play with others, who wrings his hands when he hears news anchors speaking this way and worries about the militarization of the English language. And in truth, I am getting combat fatigue from all the increased martial terms in our political discourse. There may be those who suspect that all of the above was just an excuse to use that line. Well, partly true. Our use of military metaphors began long ago with our War on Poverty, followed by our War on …

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  4. A View from the Right: Are Our Days as a Superpower over?

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    February 13, 2012 by Mike Landry

    Numerous national political commentators such as Zakaria Fareed, Tim Rutten and Mortimer Zuckerman have suggested that the United States’ reign as the world’s number one superpower is coming to a close. Do you agree? What will America’s role be in this century? One can view the health of America as a glass half empty or a glass half full. The glass half empty is that America’s role on the world stage is over. Consider the venality of our leaders in politics, media, and business; the unbridled hedonism of consumers; the ignorance of the bread-and-circuses masses; a Republican President saying we need- ed to destroy capitalism to save it; the mistaking of the last presidential election for an episode of American Idol. The can-do American spirit is declining, we think. The America that provided moral, economic, and military leader- ship for decades is collapsing under its own obese, self-centered success. Many in the world are becoming afraid, thinking “If America declines, what happens to us? Who protects us from the growing strength of China, or the stifling repression of jihad?” Mindless bureaucracies running our schools are assaulting our children for the most minor infractions in the name of “zero tolerance.” The …

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  5. Political Spectrum, A View from the Left: This 2012 election funded by …

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    January 20, 2012 by Richard Drake

    The 2012 presidential election will be the first since the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision, allowing large organizations such as unions and corporations to contribute an unlimited amount of funds to promote candidates and issues. How do you think this will affect the outcome of the race? I once wrote a short story about a fu- ture America in which people voted not for politicians, but rather the corporation they trusted they most to run the country.

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  6. Political Spectrum: A View From the Right

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    January 8, 2012 by Mike Landry

    ​In your opinion, what were the most significant political events of 2011? While Occupy Wall Street (OWS) was probably the single biggest political news event of 2011, three other things provided an ongoing political backdrop to the year. ​They were 1) the continued Obama administration attempts to remake America, 2) the up-and-down gyrations of Republican presidential candidates, and 3) the continuing change of Arkansas into a genuine, two-party state.

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  7. Political Spectrum: A View From the Left

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    January 8, 2012 by Richard Drake

    ​In your opinion, what were the most significant political events of 2011? I have been reading the views of others this December, and everyone seems to be pretty well-agreed that the top stories this year revolve around the Fukushima meltdown; the shooting of U.S. Representative Gabrielle Giffords; the death of Osama bin Laden; the repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell; and Occupy Wall Street. Okay, fair enough.

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